NICU nearing completion

Published: October 17th, 2016

Category: Announcements, For the Kids, NICU, Your Gift in Action

Phase one of the Neonatal ICU expansion at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital is nearing completion, with intensive care patients moving into the new space in November. In the renovated NICU, our tiniest, most vulnerable patients will receive care in four areas known as “neighborhoods.”

The neighborhoods will be housed in one contiguous space and named Ladybug, Dragonfly, Bumblebee and Hummingbird. While neonatal intermediate care and intensive care babies will generally be separated by neighborhood, each space is designed to meet the needs of all NICU patients — regardless of their level of care.

The neighborhoods are comfortable, family-focused areas with whimsical nature themes in harmony with the rest of the children’s hospital. The 68-bed space will have semi-private areas, as well as private rooms to help meet the education and discharge planning needs of families.

The final phase of the project — phase two — will focus on creating a large NICU waiting area featuring a sibling play space and additional seating. NICU II patients will move into the neighborhood space in spring 2017.

Learn more about this critical project at giving.UFHealth.org/NICU.

See more construction photos at blueprints.UFHealth.org.

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